How to Build Business Credit

What is business credit?
Check out our Business Credit Guide.

Go To Guide

Starting a Business

1

Choose a
Business
Structure

1
2

Get an EIN

2
3

Make Sure
You Have a
D&B D-U-N-S
Number

3
4

Separate
Business
and Personal
Credit

4

Established Business

5

Update Your
Business
Information

5
6

Pay on Time
(Or Early)

6
7

Ask for Trade
References

7
8

Monitor Your
Scores
& Ratings

8
9

Monitor
Inquiries

9
1

Choose a Business Structure

Establishing your business as a separate entity is the first step to separating your business and personal credit. Not sure why that’s important? This video should help.

Establish Your Business
2

Get an EIN

You’ll need an EIN to file your taxes and open a business bank account (step 3). Banks and potential business partners may also request it when you fill out paperwork. Having this number for your business is an important step in establishing your company.

Apply for a free EIN
3

Make sure you have a D&B
D-U-N-S® Number

Your company’s D-U-N-S Number identifies your business credit profile and helps other companies pull your business credit report.

Get an expedited D-U-N-S
Get a free D-U-N-S
Learn more about the D-U-N-S
4

Separate Business and Personal Credit

This video should help.

5

Update Your Business Information

Incomplete or inaccurate business information can impact your business credit scores and ratings. It’s easy to update your information with Company Update.

Go to Company Update
6

Pay on Time (Or Early)

When you don’t pay on time, vendors can submit negative trade references which can affect your business scores & ratings. Learn what else can affect your business credit profile.

7

Ask for Trade References

If you have vendors that you know you pay on time and that you have a good relationship with, ask them if they already submit trade references to D&B. If they don’t, see if they will. You can submit trade references yourself using CreditBuilder.

Get CreditBuilder™ Plus
8

Monitor Your Scores & Ratings

You’ll want to know if there have been changes to your business credit scores and ratings. New information like liens, judgements, bankruptcies, or negative trade references can affect your profile. Free services like CreditSignal® will send you alerts if there are any changes to your scores and ratings.

Get CreditSignal®
9

Monitor Inquiries

When a business pulls your business credit file to help determine if your company qualifies for a loan or can be trusted with a contract, it’s called an inquiry. The names of the companies pulling your report are confidential, but you can find out when an inquiry has been made and what industry the inquiring company is in.

I want to know what industries have made inquiries on my business.

I don’t want insight into industry, just inquiry alerts.

Get CreditBuilder™ Plus